- cont'd

The previous tutorial introduced some of the basic steps in preparing a PowerPoint presentation.  This tutorial will continue on, and take you through the steps in adding sound and customizing the effects and transitions.

Click here to see the previous tutorial.

 

 



Slide Transitions  

To access the animation settings select the Animation tab.

Thumbnails of the available slide transitions are displayed at the top.

Clicking on the Custom Animation Button will open the Custom Animations window, where you can apply actions to specific objects in each slide.


You can scroll down to view more transitions, or select the lower arrow to view the entire selection of transitions.

As tempting as it is, try not to use too many different styles of transition. You don't want to send anyone into a trance.


This example uses "Wipe Left" transitions.

The current slide transition is shown in the Animation ribbon at the top. Sound and speed options can be applied to individual slides, or all at once.

There are over twenty sound effects available, but use them with discretion.  Stick with one or two appropriate to your theme. You might choose not to use any at all.

Click on the Transition Speed arrow to bring up this window.

Under Advance Slide you can choose to have the slides advance automatically, or by mouse click.  Mouse clicks will over-ride the timed settings, allowing you to advance a slide manually before the time setting lapses.


 

Actions for each slide can be applied to individual items in the Custom Animation window. If you select one of the bulleted items it will simultaneously be highlighted in the Custom Animation window.


When you select a specific object in the slide, the Add Effect button will become active, allowing you apply an effect to whatever is selected. In this case, you can apply an effect to the entire bulleted list in one step, or you can select each individual line separately.

You can add an effect to the way an object enters the screen, exits the screen, or to how it appears while sustained on the screen.

The following icons indicate the type of effect applied to each object :
Entrance Emphasis Exit Motion Path

The icons will appear in the Custom Animations window when you apply an effect.


Entrance

 

 The numbers to the left refer to the order that you will see the fly-out windows.  The sequence would be to first highlight the text or object on the screen to activate the Add Effect button (1), select Entrance (2) to change the way the object appears or enters the screen.  Choose the type of behavior (3), (in this case, Fly In) that you want the text or object to take.

Repeat these steps for each object you want to change.


Emphasis

 

Highlight the text or object on the screen to activate the Add Effect button (1), select Emphasis (2) to change the way the object appears while on the screen.  Choose the type of behavior (3), (in this case, Change Font Style) while the object remains on the screen.

Repeat these steps for each object you want to change.

 


Exit

 

Highlight the text or object on the screen to activate the Add Effect button (1), select Exit (2) to change the way the object leaves the screen.  Choose the type of behavior (3), (in this case, Fly Out), as the object exits the screen.

Repeat these steps for each object you want to change.

 

 


Motion Path

 

 

Highlight the text or object on the screen to activate the Add Effect button (1), select Motion Paths (2) to change the way the object moves on the screen.  Choose the direction, or path (3) the object will take.

Optional (4): Define a custom path.

Repeat these steps for each object you want to change.

 


Steps:

In this example, the first line in the bulleted list, "Solid Construction", is set to Fly In to the screen. 

The steps are:

  1. Highlight the line of text
  2. Select Add Effect button
  3. Select Entrance
  4. Select Fly In

 


You can further customize the Start, Direction, and Speed of each object by first selecting the object in the Custom Animation window, then selecting the drop-down arrow to the right of the behavior you would like to change.

"Start" controls when the animation begins in relation to the slide show sequence.

On Click: Starts when mouse is clicked.

With Previous: Activates simultaneously with previous action.

After Previous: Waits for previous action to complete before starting.


"Direction" allows you to choose the direction of any action that has movement applied to it.

The drop-down button allows you to choose one of five "Speed" options, and can be applied to any of the effects.

Customizing Effects

Although a default setting might add life to the presentation, it may not be the most suitable for your specific needs.

Have a look at the bulleted list in the example to the right. If a speaker wanted to have an opportunity to elaborate on any of these three points, it might be better to pause on each of them to allow time for the message to 'sink in' before advancing to the next point.

If you were presenting in person you could rely on manually advancing each frame or bullet using the mouse button, but it might be more convenient to set the timing to advance automatically.

A good 'rule of thumb' in setting text transition speed and pause time is to time yourself as you read each caption, then multiply by 3. The reasoning here is that very few people will remain riveted to your presentation, no matter how fascinating it is.  People tend to glance around, blink, or otherwise get distracted.  You don't want your most important point to whiz by when a viewer is looking away.  The 3X rule is a good formula.  A faster pace, and you risk your audience missing key information, while a slower pace might become boring.


There are an infinite number of transition and effect possibilities available.  I have presented only a few of them.  The important thing to remember is that the purpose of the effects and transitions is to make your presentation more interesting and effective, not to dazzle the audience with technology.

As with most forms of communication, you will be trying to do one or more of the following:

To Inform, Convince, Persuade, or Entertain